Russians Divided Over Revolution of 1917 But Want No New Revolts – Poll

Map of Russia

MOSCOW. Nov 7 (Interfax) – The Revolution of 1917 had more pros than cons, respondents told the Russian Public Opinion Study Center (VTsIOM). The center polled 1,600 adults in 46 regions on October 27-28.

Some 27% believe the revolution spurred on social development of Russia (the indicator stood at 34% in 2002), and 21% believe it opened up a new era in national history (25% ten years ago), the sociologists said.

Meanwhile, the percentage of respondents who think that the revolution was catastrophic for Russia grew from 10% to 18% over the past decade. Seventeen percent define it as an impediment to socioeconomic development.

The revolution is mostly lauded by Communist Party supporters (37% in 2012 and 32% in 2002) and criticized by supporters of non-parliamentary parties and non-voters (22%).

Russians explain the revolution with the hard life of people (43%), the weak government (17%), political adventurism (11%) and a conspiracy of “enemies to the Russian people” (10%).

There is no unanimity about the revolution’s significance as a historic event. Forty percent said the revolution was inevitable and had its cons and pros, and 37% argued there was no excuse for the revolution.

Fifteen percent think positively of the revolution, primarily supporters of the Liberal Democratic Party (23%) and the Communist Party (26%). The percentage grew from 10% in 2002.

Seventy-eight percent of the respondents insisted that modern Russia must have no revolution. Most of such answers were given by those who deemed any revolution a tragic event (89%), supporters of United Russia (85%), supporters of non-parliamentary parties (86%) and supporters of the president (85%).

Only 13% said that Russia needed a revolution, mostly people who call a revolt a chance for social renovation (31%), supporters of the Liberal Democratic Party (32%) and the Communist Party (27%) and respondents who criticize the work of the chief of the state (27%).

Russians Divided Over Revolution of 1917 But Want No New Revolts – Poll

MOSCOW. Nov 7 (Interfax) – The Revolution of 1917 had more pros than cons, respondents told the Russian Public Opinion

Study Center (VTsIOM). The center polled 1,600 adults in 46 regions on October 27-28.

Some 27% believe the revolution spurred on social development of Russia (the indicator stood at 34% in 2002), and 21%

believe it opened up a new era in national history (25% ten years ago), the sociologists said.

Meanwhile, the percentage of respondents who think that the revolution was catastrophic for Russia grew from 10% to 18%

over the past decade. Seventeen percent define it as an impediment to socioeconomic development.

The revolution is mostly lauded by Communist Party supporters (37% in 2012 and 32% in 2002) and criticized by supporters of

non-parliamentary parties and non-voters (22%).

Russians explain the revolution with the hard life of people (43%), the weak government (17%), political adventurism (11%)

and a conspiracy of “enemies to the Russian people” (10%).

There is no unanimity about the revolution’s significance as a historic event. Forty percent said the revolution was

inevitable and had its cons and pros, and 37% argued there was no excuse for the revolution.

Fifteen percent think positively of the revolution, primarily supporters of the Liberal Democratic Party (23%) and the

Communist Party (26%). The percentage grew from 10% in 2002.

Seventy-eight percent of the respondents insisted that modern Russia must have no revolution. Most of such answers were

given by those who deemed any revolution a tragic event (89%), supporters of United Russia (85%), supporters of non-

parliamentary parties (86%) and supporters of the president (85%).

Only 13% said that Russia needed a revolution, mostly people who call a revolt a chance for social renovation (31%),

supporters of the Liberal Democratic Party (32%) and the Communist Party (27%) and respondents who criticize the work of

the chief of the state (27%).