NEWSWATCH: “Understanding Russia’s War Stories; Putin’s foreign policy is rooted in an epic myth of betrayal and redemption” – The New Republic/ Sophie Pinkham

Vladirmir Putin and Donald Trump Sitting in Chairs with Flags Behind, adapted from image at whitehouse.gov

“… From the hacking of DNC servers during the presidential campaign to links between Russian officials and Trump’s team, Democrats have leapt at the idea that Trump’s victory resulted from Russian machinations, even though there remains little evidence that the hacks decisively affected the election. Rather than revising their platform to appeal to today’s working class, Democrats have pointed their fingers at a familiar enemy; rather than listening to their base, they have put their faith in the intelligence community. Russia-blaming is an easy sell, in part, because the American narrative about Russia (or rather, about the Soviet Union) is so well-rehearsed. The rhetoric of the Cold War is still fresh in the memory of an aging political class, and a new generation of pundits has proved eager to revive it. Post-Soviet, oligarchic-capitalist Russia is frequently referred to as “Soviet” or “communist.” Last fall, during the campaign, MSNBC host Joy-Ann Reid tweeted, “For most Americans it’s shocking to see an American presidential candidate openly touting authoritarian, communist Russia.” Others even claim to have identified an essential Russianness. In May, former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper told NBC that Russians ‘are typically, almost genetically driven to co-opt, penetrate, gain favor, whatever.’ …”

Click here for: “Understanding Russia’s War Stories; Putin’s foreign policy is rooted in an epic myth of betrayal and redemption” – The New Republic/ Sophie Pinkham